molecular genomics


ecosystem impacts


global change


mutations 2 global change (m2gc)


This is a Journal Club / Seminar series based at Carnegie & Stanford.

We aim to bring together molecular biologists, evolutionary geneticists, epidemiologists, ecologists, and climate scientists, and analyze frontier research to anticipate biological changes that can affect human or ecosystem health in a changing world, and brainstorm about potential solutions.


> Meeting flexibly either Tuesday, Wednesday or Thursday every week in the Carnegie seminar room. To be up-to-date with rooms and times, access our m2gc calendar

> Email list for announcements: mutations2globalchange@googlegroups.com

> Contact Moi (moisesexpositoalonso@gmail.com) to be added to the email list or for questions/suggestions of speakers and papers.

FALL SCHEDULE (finalizing!)

Oct 17 2019 we will zoom with Ruth Shaw and discuss her paper (doi.org/10.1086/700565) on the limits of evolutionary prediction. This paper is also a great introduction to a century of mathematical population genetics.

Oct 24 2019 will feature an e-talk by Richard Neher (Basel Biozentrum) and we will discuss his nextrain.org platform. This is a virus evolution monitoring website feeding from global clinical datasets that uses phylogenetics to predict the next infectious strains.

[ Two weeks where we will join two CEHG.stanford.edu talks, one by Moi on the latest paper of genomic predictions under climate change (dx.doi.org/10.1038/s41586-019-1520-9), and another from Chris Kyriazis (UCLA) in unintended maladaptation consequences of genetic restoration of threatened populations (dx.doi.org/10.1101/678524) ]

Nov 12 2019 will feature a talk by Matthew Kling (UC Berkeley) and we will discuss the use of various quantitative large-scale models to understand the vulnerabilities of vegetation across the landscape (http://matthewkling.github.io/media/).

Nov 26 2019 will feature an e-talk from Tom Crowther (ETH) and we will discuss the recent global restoration projection paper (dx.doi.org/10.1126/science.aax0848), which recently proposed 0.9 billion hectares of canopy cover could be restored to sink 205 gigatonnes of CO2.

(TBC) will feature a talk by Valentino Ganz (UC San Diego) on his co-invention, CRISPR gene drives (doi.org/10.1073/pnas.1521077112), to "control" species demographic and evolutionary fates.

(TBC) we will discuss Laura Hayward's recent theory paper on polygenic adaptation after a sudden change in the environment (dx.doi.org/10.1101/792952).